1. #1

    Default 2017 Salmon Season

    Hey guys...they are having meetings right now concerning the 2017 salmon season. Last year we got thrown under the bus with a last minute decision to close us June 1st, even though there was no scientific merit for the decision!!! We need our voices to be heard so we don't suffer a similar fate this year!

    Here is where you send your comments:
    Mike.Burner@noaa.gov
    pfmc.comments@noaa.gov

    Below are some talking points if you aren't familiar with the issue:

    Comments on CDFW Recommendations for the 2017 Salmon Season
    As recreational fishermen fishing in Morro Bay/Avila, we feel that we were not treated fairly in 2016 salmon season. We were closed on June 1 while the commercial salmon fleet was allowed to keep fishing through the month of June even though they kill many more fish. The same closure dates are now being recommended for 2017.
    Our position is that the CDFW Recommendations use flawed analysis to determine the impact to the population of concern, endangered winter-run (WR) Chinook, and that there is no good reason to close the recreational season in Morro Bay/Avila while the commercial season stays open. We ask that CDFW review our reasoning below, then work with us to ensure equitable access to the resource in 2017.

    Impact Rate Should Include Mortality of “Shorts” Released by Commercial Fishermen
    The CDFW Recommendations report the impact rate on WR Chinook for Morro Bay/Avila in June as 1:200 for commercial and 1:9 for recreational. As observed in the document, this difference is due to the higher size limit for commercial (27") vs. recreational (24”). The methodology used to derive this impact rate is flawed and misleading because it does not correctly account for the mortality of released fish between 24”-27” by the commercial fleet.
    The commercial salmon fleet in Morro Bay/Avila is fishing the exact same waters and the exact same body of fish as the recreational fishermen to the extent that they must avoid each other while trolling to prevent crossing lines. Commercial fishermen are absolutely hooking the same WR fish at the same rate (1:9) as recreational fishermen. The only difference is that the commercials have to release the 'shorts' under 27" but many of these fish do not survive. A simple reasonableness check demonstrates that wide difference between the 1:200 impact rate for commercial and 1:9 impact rate for recreational cannot be correct.
    Mortality rates for released shorts were, unfortunately, not included in the CDFW Recommendations draft document but we were told by Michael O’Farrell of NOAA that it is 31% for Commercial and 19% for Recreational. If we apply the mortality of releases, the minimum possible impact rate on fish > 24” for commercials is the recreational impact rate times the commercial mortality rate: 1/9 *.31 or 1:29 not 1:200 reported in the document which is clearly a gross underestimate.
    There is no data in the document on how many WR Chinook in the June population are < 24”, but, since all are released, commercial will have a greater impact rate on these fish (31% mortality) than recreational (19% mortality).

    Impact vs. Impact rate
    The CDFW Recommendations analysis focuses entirely on analyzing the impact rate. As we have shown, this rate calculation is flawed because it does not account correctly for the significant mortality of released fish, but, beyond that, the analysis does not consider the number that is most relevant to the survival of WR Chinook: total fish kills (total impact).
    For June in Morro Bay/Avila, recreational fishermen kill an average of 100 fish of which 1:9, or 11 fish are WR. Commercial fishermen catch an average of 700 fish of which 1:200, or 3 fish are WR but in doing so they are also killing 31% of fish < 27”. The CDFW document does not include data on population of WR by size and without this information it is not possible to calculate the total WR fish kill by commercial fishermen but it will clearly be much higher than the 11 fish killed by recreational fishermen.
    Alternative Size Limit In June For Recreational Fisherman
    Recreational fishermen in Morro Bay/Avila are almost entirely fishing from small private boats, generally only fish in calm weather and, of course, are bound by a two fish bag limit. Closing the salmon fishery in June has a significant impact on us because the best weather is in June and the kids are off school so we lose recreational opportunity. It is frustrating to be closed while the commercial fishery stays open when we know they are killing many more WR fish than we are.

    The impact rate of the recreational fishery is much closer to the commercial rate if mortality of released shorts is properly accounted for. Additionally, the recreational fishery has a much lower total impact. We should be able to continue fishing as long as the commercial fishery is open.

    If CDFW believes that the resource can tolerate the impacts of the commercial fleet in June with a 27” size limit but cannot tolerate the impacts of the recreational fleet with a 24” size limit, then the simplest way to avoid June closure of the recreational fishery is to raise the recreational size limit to 27” on June 1. With the size limits equal, the commercial fishery will actually have a greater impact rate than recreational due to higher mortality of released shorts, as well as a greater total impact due to higher impact rate and much larger number of fish caught.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    108

    Default

    77 views and not one reply. Same with the sanctuary post. To put it in plain enough english for EVERYONE to understand, WE ARE GETTING SCREWED. Do what you can, send an e-mail, show up at a meeting. Anything will help, which is a lot more than the majority of you are doing.

  3. #3

    Default

    thanks for the info on where to send the letter. I got one off in a matter of minutes.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    avila
    Posts
    64

    Default

    i don't profess to know any statistics or inside information. but why the **** does it always sound like recreational fishermen want to throw commercial fishermen under the bus any time they want more?

  5. #5

    Default Can't have it all

    maybe they let the season go longer for commercial guys because that is how they make a living, and you guys are doing it for fun.

  6. #6

    Default

    No one is inferring we should throw the commercial fishermen under the bus. We are just hoping to have on a level playing field. You have to admit that ONLY PSL/MB being shut down last year on May 31 was ridiculous. There was no scientific basis for that decision. In fact it was proposed at the last minute and went against NOAA's recommendation (to stay open until June 30). It sounded very political and since the Central Coast is underrepresented by any big groups, it was easy to do it. We are hoping that by making our voices heard that recreational fishermen will not be thrown under the bus again this year.

    Quote Originally Posted by taurus View Post
    i don't profess to know any statistics or inside information. but why the **** does it always sound like recreational fishermen want to throw commercial fishermen under the bus any time they want more?

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    See Canyon
    Posts
    127

    Default

    The sports got hosed. And looks like the same again this yr.

  8. #8
    KJ6TQG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    I live in Bakersfield CA.
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    275

    Default

    Very unfortunate that, not only is the cost of going fishing almost out of reach, but the Feds are regulating the little guy into oblivion...Too bad, I always enjoyed fishing and boating...
    "Creepy Azz Cracker" Proud to be a member of the true minority.......

  9. #9

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Shell Beach, CA
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    65

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Surflinesucks View Post
    maybe they let the season go longer for commercial guys because that is how they make a living, and you guys are doing it for fun.
    That is a bullsh*t argument. The resource belongs to everyone.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    avila
    Posts
    64

    Default

    The resource belongs to everyone.

    i couldn't agree more. commercial fishermen represent those who are unable or don't want to catch their own fish. some are not privileged enough to own a boat...... those people have a right to access the resource also.

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