Thread: Just FYI

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2019
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    17

    Default Just FYI

    I know were all supposed to check this every year but if it saves one person a ticket its worth a post

    1. No more bag limit of canary, black rock cod, cabezon, or greenlings

    2. New bag limit of 5 vermillion

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Eh, you might want to re-read the new regs. I don't see anything about the sub-bag limit for greenlings increasing. They read as follows...

    "Elimination of the sub-bag limit for black rockfish, canary rockfish, and cabezon within the 10-fish Rockfish, Cabezon, Greenling (RCG) complex daily bag limit".

    The word "within" identifies a difference between the fish species that are undergoing limit changes, and the overall type of limit that those fish fall within (rockfish, cabezon, and greenling).

    I applaud you for trying to spare someone the financial hardship of receiving a ticket, but stuff like this is exactly why people shouldn't look to forums to try and figure out what is, and is not, legal...

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Sep 2019
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    You’re absolutely right i did misread that and i apologize to whoever may have read it when i glanced over it i must have seen greenling and just written it down sorry y’all

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    Default

    No worries. Id hope that people would read the regs for themselves before next April, but realistically I know a lot of them wont. I just wanted to point out the mistake before someone read your post and assumed the info about the greenlings was correct.

    2021 is going to be an interesting season, especially for the party boats. Theyve spent the bulk of the careers striving to fill their customers sacks with reds, and now that sub-limit is going to throw a wrench into things. Seeing a canary or two floating away is one thing (I know a lot of boats tried to use descender devices), but sending big reds back to the bottom is going to be hard for a lot of customers to take, especially when a customer has five small reds baking in the sun in their sack and they have to release a 5 pound red.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Sep 2019
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    Yea it’s the same on my boat it’ll be a weird adjustment because i typically fish over 200 and our limits come from reds and the occasional big blue bass but attempting to release a big red after being pulled from 250’ even with a device is pretty long odds that it survives ... i think it’s dumb but not my call all we can do is our best right?

  6. #6

    Default

    Good discussion points. Definitely will be interesting and its not ideal, we just gotta try our best!
    Perhaps after getting a limit of reds at 250' , it would be best to move into 50-75ft to help increase the odds of survivability for the fish.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Atascadero, Ca
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    238

    Default

    Something that does not get discussed much is that you do not need to get fish back down to the depth it was caught at. The pressure at Sea level is 14.7 PSI. Every 33 feet you descend add another 14.7 PSI. So at 33' pressure in now 29.4 psi, 66 feet = 44.1 psi, 99 feet = 58.8psi. The biggest pressure change is in the upper 66'. Often you will feel the fish fighting to get free of the descender device before this. ideally you would want to get down to 100' to release if fishing deeper than 200'
    It is important to have that rod and descender device ready to use. Time on surface is critical to the fish.

    This info is common knowledge among scuba divers. If you have ever held your breath diving to the bottom of a pool you will feel that pressure on your ears.

  8. #8
    Keith's Avatar
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    Aug 2012
    Location
    Paso Robles
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    125

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    Another good tip for those wanting to increase survivability of deep-caught fish - don't crank 'em up so fast. What kills fish brought up from deep is the same thing that kills people who come up too fast - they get the bends. Human divers generally ascend at a rate between 30-60 feet per minute in order to avoid the condition. Fortunately I found that you don't have to bring 'em up THAT slow.
    I have found that once I have one hooked (fish, not diver), if I just bring him up on a nice slow retrieve - just fast enough to keep tension on the line - they are in much better shape than if I crank 'em up fast as I can. So, do what 'Buzz said, and also take it easy bringing them up, and you'll have pretty good luck returning them in decent shape.

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